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  • Debris found on Australian beach not from MH370

  • An Australian Navy sailor looks for debris on a rigid inflatable boat as HMAS Perth searches for missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH 370 in the southern Indian Ocean, April 13, 2014Perth (Australia) (AFP) - The Australian Transport Safety Bureau ruled out Thursday any link between material found on a beach in southwestern Australia and the missing Malaysia Airlines jet. However ATSB chief commissioner Martin Dolan scotched any hope of a breakthrough.



  • Australia transport bureau says beach debris not from MH370

  • Handout of crew aboard the Australian Defence Vessel Ocean Shield moving the U.S. Navy's Bluefin-21 into position for deployment, in the southern Indian Ocean to look for the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370Debris picked up on a beach in Western Australia this week is unlikely to have come from the Malaysian Airlines jet that vanished nearly seven weeks ago, Australia's transport bureau said on Thursday. The Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) has assessed the material that washed up on the coast 10 km (six miles) east of the town of Augusta, near the southwestern tip of Australia, the bureau's spokesman said. "It's considered highly unlikely to be from MH370," spokesman Tony Simes said. ATSB commissioner Martin Dolan earlier told Australian Broadcasting Corporation radio that the bureau had examined detailed photographs of the debris and was satisfied it was not a lead in the hunt for the plane.



  • Australia transport safety chief says beach debris not from MH370: ABC Radio

  • Handout of crew aboard the Australian Defence Vessel Ocean Shield moving the U.S. Navy's Bluefin-21 into position for deployment, in the southern Indian Ocean to look for the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370MELBOURNE (Reuters) - Australia's transport safety chief said on Thursday he was confident that debris picked up on a Western Australian beach this week had not come from the missing Malaysian Airlines flight 370. Australian Transport Safety Bureau Chief Commissioner Martin Dolan told Australian Broadcasting Corp Radio that he was looking at detailed photographs of the debris taken by the police. (Reporting by Sonali Paul; Editing by Chris Reese)



  • 'Unidentified material' under investigation for MH370 link

  • This photo taken on April 9, 2014 by Australian Defence shows a Royal Australian Air Force AP-3C Orion flying past Australian Defence Vessel Ocean Shield on a mission to assist in the search for flight MH370 in the southern Indian OceanPerth (Australia) (AFP) - Authorities are investigating whether "unidentified material" washed up on the southwest coast of Australia has any link to missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370, officials said Wednesday. "Western Australia Police have attended a report of material washed ashore 10 kilometres (six miles) east of Augusta and have secured the material," Australia's Joint Agency Coordination Centre said in a statement. The Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) is examining photographs of the material to determine whether it has any links to the search for the missing jet, it added.



  • Possible Malaysian plane debris found on Australian coast

  • PERTH, Australia (Reuters) - Unidentified material washed up on the Australian coastline is being investigated for possible links to a Malaysian jetliner that disappeared more than seven weeks ago with 239 people on board, the Australian authorities said on Wednesday. Australian police have secured the material, found 10 km (6 miles) east of the town of Augusta at the southern tip of Western Australia state, the Joint Agency Coordination Centre said in a statement. ...
  • Pirates raid oil tanker off Malaysia, take away three crew

  • The Japanese oil tanker which was raided by armed pirates sails at Port KlangBy Al-Zaquan Amer Hamzah and Keith Wallis KUALA LUMPUR/SINGAPORE (Reuters) - Armed pirates raided an oil tanker off the coast of Malaysia and took three crew members with them, Malaysian maritime officials said on Wednesday, underscoring increasing threats to shipping in one of the world's busiest waterways. The incident in the Malacca Strait, a route for about a quarter of the world's seaborne oil trade, has fuelled fears piracy could be on the rise in the area and drive up ship insurance premiums. "We are very concerned," said Noel Choong, head of the International Maritime Bureau's Malaysia-based Piracy Reporting Centre, who added the ship was hijacked while sailing near the Malaysia town of Port Klang. "It's the first time this has happened so far north in the Malacca Strait, and the first time they have kidnapped the crew.



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