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  • At U.N. climate talks, many seek sterner warnings of GDP losses

  • By Alister Doyle, Environment Correspondent OSLO, March 28 (Reuters) - Many governments want sterner warnings of probable economic damage from global warming in a draft U.N. report due on Monday, saying that existing estimates of trillions of dollars in losses are only part of the picture. A final draft before talks this week among governments and scientists in Japan projected that warming would cut economic output by between 0.2 and 2.0 percent a year by damaging human health, disrupting water supplies and raising sea levels. But many countries reckon that is an underestimate because it excludes risks of catastrophic changes, such as a runaway melt of Greenland's ice, collapse of coral reefs or a drying of the Amazon rainforest that could cause massive economic losses. Trying to address the objections, an updated draft text from the meeting on Friday, obtained by Reuters, adds that impact estimates "do not yet account for catastrophic changes, tipping points, and many other details." "The quoted figures of 0.2 to 2.0 percent of GDP (gross domestic product) are at best an under-estimate, and at worst completely meaningless," a note by the British government said before the meeting, faulting the draft for omitting many risks.
  • UN chief on Greenland climate change visit

  • U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon, center, and Greenland's Environment Minister Kim Kielsen, right, Tuesday, March 25, 2014 in Ilulissat in Greenland. The visit takes place in preparation for the U.N. Climate Summit on September this year in New York. (AP Photo/POLFOTO, Leiff Josefsen) DENMARK OUTCOPENHAGEN, Denmark (AP) — Global warming must not be forgotten, U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said Wednesday after visiting Greenland to get an up-close look at the consequences of climate problems.



  • Gigantic Cambrian Shrimplike Creature Unearthed in Greenland

  • Gigantic Cambrian Shrimplike Creature Unearthed in GreenlandA new filter-feeding giant that trolled the Cambrian seas has been unearthed in Greenland. The species, dubbed Tamisiocaris borealis, used large, bristly appendages on its body to rake in tiny shrimplike creatures from the sea, and likely evolved from the top predators of the day to take advantage of a bloom in new foods in its ecosystem, said study co-author Jakob Vinther, a paleobiologist at the University of Bristol in England. The new creature was unearthed in sediments known as the Sirius Passet formation.



  • Forget GPS: Medieval Compass Guided Vikings After Sunset

  • Forget GPS: Medieval Compass Guided Vikings After SunsetOften regarded as ruthless robbers, the Vikings were also impressive mariners capable of traversing the North Atlantic along a nearly straight line. The remains of the supposed compass — known as the Uunartoq disc— were found in Greenland in 1948 in an 11th-century convent.



  • Shifts in rainfall, not warming pause, slow sea level rise

  • File photo of icebergs reflected in the calm waters at the mouth of the Jakobshavn ice fjord near IlulissatBy Alister Doyle, Environment Correspondent OSLO (Reuters) - Heavy rains from the Amazon to Australia have curbed sea level rise so far this century by shifting water from the oceans to land, according to a study that rejects theories that the slowdown is tied to a pause in global warming. Sea level rise has been one of the clearest signs of climate change - water expands as it warms and parts of Greenland and Antarctica are thawing, along with glaciers from the Himalayas to the Alps. Writing in the journal Nature Climate Change on Sunday, experts said the rate from 2003-2011 would have been 3.3 mm a year when excluding natural shifts led by an unusually high number of La Nina weather events that cool the surface of the Pacific Ocean and cause more rain over land. "There is no slowing in the rate of sea level rise" after accounting for the natural variations, lead author Anny Cazenave of the Laboratory for Studies in Geophysics and Spatial Oceanography in Toulouse, France, told Reuters.



  • Welsh band handed US Air Force gig

  • A Denbighshire band say they have been handed a gig of a lifetime after being booked by the Pentagon office to tour US Air Force bases in Greenland, Cuba, Honduras and the Bahamas.
  • Four new gases that harm ozone layer found, despite bans: study

  • By Alister Doyle, Environment Correspondent OSLO (Reuters) - Scientists have detected four new man-made gases that damage the Earth's protective ozone layer, despite bans on almost all production of similar gases under a 1987 treaty, a study showed on Sunday. The experts were trying to pinpoint industrial sources of tiny traces of the new gases, perhaps used in making pesticides or refrigerants, that were found in Greenland's ice and in air samples in Tasmania, Australia. The ozone layer shields the planet from damaging ultra-violet rays, which can cause skin cancer and eye cataracts, and has been recovering after a phase-out of damaging chemicals under the U.N.'s 1987 Montreal Protocol. "The concentrations are not yet a threat to the ozone layer," lead author Johannes Laube of the University of East Anglia in England told Reuters of the three types of CFCs (chlorofluorocarbon) and one HCFC (hydrochlorofluorocarbon).
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